SHOUT Festival 2019

SHOUT festival guides (with x4 covers no less) available now from Birmingham LGBT centre and soon across the city, following the programme launch last week.

All the colour and an absolute joy. There’s a ‘how to use this guide’ in the front with the welcome letter, and a pull-out listings and map centrefold. This was a great idea by Adam Carver who’s a dreamboat to work with💥.

SHOUT have a commitment to removing barriers and have detailed important info for the events, such as access, age ratings and trigger warnings. Every single event is wheelchair accessible (this should be a given in this day and age but it isn’t, yet). There are also free tickets for people on a low income: generous and inclusive.

SHOUT are doing important work in the city and I’m so proud to have worked on the designs this year. I’ll be seeing you there 🙌

More info & tickets at www.shoutfestival.co.uk

📸swiped photo from SHOUT via Facebook

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Cotteridge Park Rocks

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This map - in print - is one of the end result’s of an 18 month HLF-funded project Cotteridge Park Rocks. Friends of Cotteridge Park received a grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund to enable the park volunteers to find out more about the history and geology of the park, to record oral histories and enhance the park’s historic arboretum.

Large boulders were found when the park was laid out in the early 20th century. Louis Barrow (Chief Engineer at the Cadbury Factory and a geologist) had them excavated and put on display. Even Professor Lapworth (of Lapworth Museum of Geology), visited the park to see them. We know that the rocks are a feature of the drift geology of this region. These ‘glacial erratics’ travelled via a glacier from north Wales up to 400,000 years ago - they were left behind when the ice melted. We’ve discovered they were formed from a volcano about 450 million years ago!

New technology was a large part of documenting the project, Podnosh has created an online map with layers where you can find out more about the stories of the park - with plotted on quotes, photos and trees. As you walk round the park you can use your smart phone to receive these stories/info at site-specific locations. If you do not have access to a smartphone, or online, the printed map is the most accessible and tactile version - you can pick up a printed map at CoCoMAD. It has been printed on FSC-approved paper and with environmentally-friendly inks.

I created a bright + fun brand identity and icon set, and this A5 fold out to A3 printed map which has been modified for Issuu, below.

More about the project, including how you can get involved such as adding your own stories and photos to the map - on the park's website:- https://cotteridgepark.org.uk/history/map/

#CotteridgeParkRocks

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'The Cracker', Laura Pannack for BLAST Photography Festival (Multistory)

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Last month I designed a 40 page magazine called THE CRACKER, a project by photographer Laura Pannack, for Multistory’s BLAST Photography Festival, project managed by Becky Sexton (these are her photos of the magazine - ta!)

The Cracker is a series of portraits of teenagers living in Tipton. As a starting point, Laura was introduced to them by Sandwell Youth Services and then continued to return over a period of one year as she was drawn to this area for its tight knit community. Through her photographs, she aims to explore the friendships, the unique language and tradition of the area and the characters that, “for me, should not be lost or ignored”.

The portraits were published in a magazine for the participants and presented at an outdoor screening at a special event with food and music in collaboration with Sandwell Youth Service.

Blast! is a festival made with and for the people of Sandwell – running from Friday 24 May – Saturday 29 June 2019. Exhibitions, film screenings, events, talks and walks will be presented on the streets, the Metro line, shops and libraries and pubs, on historic buildings and in the community halls and venues of Sandwell. More info on BLAST’s website.

The magazine was available for free for the community on the launch event on Friday 31st May at ‘The Tibby’ in Tipton, and I think you can buy the magazine throughout the duration of the festival (priced at £5) and will be on Multistory’s website (correct me if I’m wrong-!)

Do take a look at more of Laura Pannack’s work via her instagram & website!

Lastly, fellow Stirchley-based designer Louise Byng has illustrated Tipton Tales, a book printed by my friend The Holodeck. Available to buy too! #vivaStirchley #vivaSandwell !

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Represent Project - Peoples Heritage Cooperative & The Active Wellbeing Society

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New project klaxon! I’ve been commissioned by the People’s Heritage Co-operative and The Active Wellbeing Society to work on an 18 month / three-phase design project for ‘Represent’. I plan on documenting my work on the project as we go.

Represent focuses specifically on the impact and legacy in Birmingham of the 'Representation of the People Act, 1918', which extended the franchise to include most men, and for the first time some women. It had a radical impact on political representation, campaigning and the development of civic life in Birmingham and it was the beginning of an exciting era of ideas and activism. Coupled with the huge upheavals of the First World War and citizens’ responses to this, the post-1918 period of Birmingham's history is rich with important stories which still have resonance today.

The project will engage with members of the Saheli Hub and Edgbaston Community Centre and focus both on women's roles as active citizens and historic housing campaigns, drawing parallels between then and now. The project will culminate in a touring exhibition (which I will be designing the interpretation for).

Through exploring local archives and drawing on their own lived experiences, the groups will 'represent' their archival research for new audiences through the touring exhibition, co-created with local artists, due to tour to leisure centres and other community venues in Summer 2020.

The project is managed by Project Manager Rachel Gillies, supported by a project Advisory Group and monthly meetings of the Committee of the People’s Heritage Co-operative.

Last week (Weds 27th March) I had my first visit to the Wolfson Centre for Archival Research on the fourth floor at the Library of Birmingham - I can’t share the archival images due to copyright restrictions - however the Wolfson centre is open to the public and is free of charge so you can go and explore yourself! You just need to request an appointment in advance and bring along ID. I loved looking through 100 year old printed materials and it has given me a lot of ideas for the direction the identity and preliminary stages of the design.

This week (Thurs 5th April) I visited my friend’s traditional printing workshop The Holodeck in Digbeth, as a starting point for the identity design and also to discuss producing a promotional flyer to tell people about this project / how they can get involved / follow the updates. The Holodeck has a number of vintage printing presses including an Arab press which is the kind of press which would have been used to print the parliamentary posters / printed ephemera we were looking through in the archives last week. Joseph also has an extensive collection of wooden block type sets which have decorative blocks / flourishes - these are stunning pieces of design and I hope to feature them - especially as most of the records that we were looking through are text based and have decorative borders.

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Bournville Hub (community space)

Here’s a new identity design project I’ve been working on for the last couple of months alongside the larger-scale arts projects for New Art Gallery Walsall, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery and Oxford University Museum of Natural History - a visual identity system for small community organisation Bournville Hub.

I love working with individuals on small community-based projects like this, I feel like the design elevates an already great project and has the opportunity to empower the client by making them even more proud of their work - which ultimately helps them to spread their message so they can reach more people within the community. Bournville Hub have a number of workshops, activities, meet-ups, classes and events, for all ages - and in particular I admire the work they are doing to tackle isolation in the ageing population by creating The Age of Creativity, a festival for 50+s, a group so often not given the spotlight.

It’s not often I post the straight-up logo and identity projects I work on - but these brightly coloured ‘diamonds’ have been cheering up some of the grey January days we’ve been having. This project launched at the beginning of January and is being rolled out gradually through their marketing and incremental changes to the building’s interior and website.

For more about Bournville Hub, the best place for info is their Facebook. A new website is in the works!

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